The Caregiver Gap

May 6, 2019

As part of the PharmaVOICE article: “The Caregiver Gap,” Lead Behaviorist, Partnerships and Advocacy, Andi Weiss offered her thoughts on how pharma can help caregivers.


Read the PharmaVOICE article.

Here’s what Andi had to say:

  • It’s critical that pharma views the caregiver as a partner. This is an opportunity for pharma to recognize the challenges caregivers face and provide solutions to help ease their burden.
  • Caregivers are instrumental in helping patients understand and move forward with their treatment plan. Besides managing symptoms, caregivers help with addressing the day-to-day physical and emotional challenges related to clinical and psychosocial needs of patients.
  • Caregivers are valuable and trusted partners. Like the patients they care for, their challenges need to be addressed. To drive patient engagement, brands need to involve the patient and the caregiver. The best solution is for marketers to create evidence-based skill-building programs that go beyond education. These programs help caregivers build skills to care for themselves and their loved ones, learn to cope, communicate effectively, and solve problems that commonly surface with the condition or treatment of their loved one.
To help caregivers, pharma should consider these questions.

Are caregivers for your brand:

  • Taking on a new or different role in the life of a patient?
  • Juggling their own needs along with the needs of the patient they are caring for?
  • Having to become an expert of a new disease on their own?
  • Feeling confident in their ability to communicate with healthcare providers about their loved one’s condition?
Caregivers are valuable and trusted partners. Like the patients they care for, their challenges need to be addressed. To drive patient engagement, brands need to involve the patient and the caregiver. The best solution is for marketers to create evidence-based skill-building programs that go beyond education. These programs help caregivers build skills to care for themselves and their loved ones, learn to cope, communicate effectively, and solve problems that commonly surface with the condition or treatment of their loved one.


Read the PharmaVOICE article.